The Urbanization and Global Environmental Change (UGEC) project targets the generation of new knowledge on the bi-directional interactions and feedbacks between urbanization processes and Global Environmental Change at local, regional, and global scales.

The project follows a multi-disciplinary approach to develop innovative conceptual and methodological frameworks for the advancement of UGEC science and the comprehensive understanding of the driving and resulting economic, socio-political, cultural and physical processes. An important feature of the project is to provide a platform for learning and knowledge exchange between a broad range of local, national, and regional actors working on urban and environmental issues. It facilitates regional and thematic networks with the goal of creating stronger links between practitioners, decision-makers, and researchers for more successful science-policy-practice interaction.

Onward, the project is expected to continue strengthening the collaboration and coordination of its networks and broaden its reach across geographies, disciplines and other communities at large. It will continue to champion urban and environmental change research — a critical need for the future of global sustainability.

UGEC, now a Future Earth project, formerly an International Human Dimensions Programme on Global Environmental Change (IHDP) project, along with other partners of the Future Earth Urban Platform (FEUP), is leading the transition of the urban agenda within Future Earth through the establishment of urban flagship activities and the design of an urban platform for facilitating interdisciplinary research coordination and co-design with urban stakeholders and practitioners.

Since 2006, the UGEC IPO has been hosted by the Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability (GIOS) at Arizona State University and is financially supported by ASU and the U.S. National Science Foundation.

NSFThe material on this website is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0619905.